Spirit

Neal A. Maxwell Headshot

“We live and teach amid a wide variety of individual personalities, experiences, cultures, languages, interests, and needs. Only the Spirit can compensate fully for such differences.”

Elder Neal A. Maxwell  |  That Ye May Believe (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1992), 39.

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“The most important thing you can do is to learn to talk to God. Talk to Him as you would talk to your father, for He is your Father, and He wants you to talk to Him. He wants you to cultivate ears to listen, when He gives you the impressions of the Spirit to tell you what to do.”

Harold B. Lee  |  “Pres. Lee Gives Solemn Witness,” Church News, 3 Mar. 1973, 3.

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“I believe that, notwithstanding the fact the spirits of men, as an incident to mortality, are deprived of memory and cast out of the presence of God, there still persists in the spirit of every human soul a residuum from his pre-existent spiritual life which instinctively responds to the voice of the Spirit until and unless it is inhibited by the free agency of the individual.”

Marion G. Romney  |  Revelation (address to seminary and institute faculty, Brigham Young University, 8 July 1960), 6–7.

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It is peculiar to the theology of the Latter-day Saints that we regard the body as an essential part of the soul. Read your dictionaries, the lexicons, and encyclopedias, and you will find that nowhere [in Christianity], outside of the Church of Jesus Christ, is the solemn and eternal truth taught that the soul of man is the body and the spirit combined.

James E. Talmage  |  CR, October 1913, p. 117

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Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf

“Like two sides of a coin, the temporal and spiritual are inseparable…The Giver of all life has proclaimed, ‘All things unto me are spiritual, and not at any time have I given unto you a law which was temporal.’ This means to me that “spiritual life is first of all a life. It is not merely something to be known and studied, it is to be lived.”

Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf  |  Providing in the Lord’s Way

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“What is the central characteristic of those having only five loaves and two fishes? What makes it possible, under the Master’s touch, for them to serve, lift, and bless so that they touch for good the lives of hundreds, even thousands? After a lifetime of dealing in the affairs of men and women, I believe it is the ability to overcome personal ego and pride – both are enemies to the full enjoyment of the Spirit of God and walking humbly before him. The ego interferes with husbands and wives asking each other for forgiveness. It prevents the enjoyment of the full sweetness of a higher love. The ego often prevents parents and children from fully understanding each other. The ego enlarges our feelings of self-importance and worth. It blinds us to reality. Pride keeps us from confessing our sins and shortcomings to the Lord and working out our repentance.”

James E. Faust  |  Ensign, May 1994, p. 6

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“In Mormon theology there is no place for immateralism; i.e. for a God, spirits and angels that are not material. Spirit is only a refined form of matter. It is beyond the mind of man to conceive of an immaterial thing. On the other hand, Joseph Smith did not teach that the kind of tangible matter, which impresses our mortal senses, is the kind of matter which is associated with heavenly beings. The distinction between the matter known to man and the spirit matter is very great; but no greater than is the difference between the matter of the known elements and that of the universal ether which forms one of the accepted dogmas of science.”

John A. Widtsoe  |  Excerpt From: John A. Widtsoe. “Joseph Smith as Scientist.” iBooks.

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